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Palo Alto Historic Buildings Inventory

1115 Ramona Street

Professorville Historic District

inventory photo 1115 Ramona
Inventory photo Photo taken January 7, 2012

 

The following is from the Historic Buildings Inventory as revised in 1985:

Physical appearance:   The lack of ornamentation reveals the powerful forms of the gambrel wood–shingle–roofed Colonial Revival design. The third story dormer, a later addition, is a rare example of an insensitive alteration which persersely enhances and enforces the power of the building's original image. The width of the soffits and the size of the windows recede in size with the weight of the building.

Significance:  A powerful image and a good example of the style, this building is also a component of a fine block face.

The first residents were "two Stanford professors, Edwin and Chloe Starks. He was a zoologist, specifically an ichthyologist, as was Stanford's president, Dr. Jorda. Mrs. Starks illustrated the works of both men. Their redwood–paneled study and art studio are still intact on the second floor."  (...Gone Tomorrow?)

From 1959 to 1984 it was the home of William A. and Joan Wallace; Wallace was supervisor of administrative services at Stanford University.

 

plaque
Centennial plaque
driveway
Robert Brandeis photo 1115 Ramona
location map

This house was built in 1903 and is a Category 2 on the Historic Buildings Inventory. The builder was Gus Laumeister. The property measures 87.50 by 105 feet.

Sources: P. A. City Directories; AAUW, ...Gone Tomorrow?; P. A. Times 1/1/04, 12/30/32, 3/17/52; Book 272 (Deeds), p. 461, 12/5/03 (Santa Clara Co. Recorder)

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